• Must demonstrate examples of an extraordinary initiative that has actively worked with the Aboriginal community to build capacity at a local or regional level.

  • *Mt Druitt Indigenous Choir Open or Close
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    Mt Druitt Indigenous Choir, also known as the One Good Day Choir, was formed for a Christmas Show in 2010 and has been popular with language songs at over 160 NAIDOC and cultural events. The choir has a community focus that builds families and lifts spirits.

    All of the work revolves around the themes of dreaming, healing and leading. Many songs also explore the seven wonders of Indigenous life including kinship, language and food. The choir provides the opportunity to celebrate the past, a very clear connection with the present and a hope for the future.

  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Ministry of Food Cooking Classes Open or Close
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    The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Ministry of Food Cooking Class was held at the Jamie Oliver Ministry of Food cooking centre in Wetherill Park. This five week program was taught by a professional cookery teacher and aimed to increase awareness of healthy eating and equip Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander service users with the skills, knowledge and confidence to prepare simple, tasty, fast and healthy meals using fresh produce for themselves and their families.

    The introduction of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Ministry of Food Cooking Class has seen participation in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Support program increase. This is despite the community historically being difficult to reach. Through word of mouth the number of community members willing to access the service has grown.

  • Daramu Open or Close
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    Daramu is a youth justice program operated by Marist Youth Care which targets Aboriginal young people, 12 to 18 Years old, in contact with Juvenile Justice or at risk of offending. Daramu is based in Mt Druitt.

    Through intensive case management and culturally specific programs, young people are supported to choose positive pro social pathways and to address the issues which are influencing their offending to build safer communities.

    Young people are assisted to access services such as education and vocational training, health services, counselling and accommodation providers. Daramu also aims to help young people create a modern, positive Aboriginal identity.

  • Kasey is Missing Open or Close
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    Kasey is Missing is the culmination of a six year partnership between Information and Cultural Exchange (ICE) and Nepean Community Neighbourhood Services (NCNS) in Penrith. Both organisations shared expertise from their respective fields through an on-going creative partnership using digital media to engage the Aboriginal community of Penrith.

    The result is a five part web series project collecting and honouring local stories over the length of the partnership and developing them into an international standard production. This work has been widely praised both by the local community and film industry. Kasey is Missing has had an extensive positive impact throughout the community in terms of professional, personal and community development.

  • Koori Outreach (Doonside) Open or Close
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    Koori Outreach is a partnership between Blacktown Community Corrections Office and Blacktown Area Community Centres Inc. (BACC) which aims to improve access to Aboriginal services, Aboriginal organisations and Aboriginal workers. Koori Outreach has been meeting on the first Wednesday of the month since 2008. Prior to the launch of the Outreach a needs analysis was completed in consultation with the local community.

    This consultation highlighted a significant gap in service provision with poor access by community members in Doonside to Aboriginal services, Aboriginal organisations and Aboriginal workers. This strong partnership has continued to be successful as it is based on the model of: Thinking Strategically, Acting Collaboratively.

  • Reconciliation Day at Prospect Hill Open or Close
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    Holroyd City Council, in partnership with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Consultative Committee (ATSICC), held an interactive commemorative event to raise awareness of the first known act of reconciliation in Australia. In 1805 a group of women from the Darug nation organised a meeting with white colonial settlers, led by the Reverend Samuel Marsden, on Prospect Hill to bring about peace after a turbulent period of fighting in the region.

    Four years ago Council and the ATSICC initiated a commemorative event to highlight the significance of the Prospect Hill site. It has since evolved into the inclusive event which attracted 120 members of the community representing Indigenous and non-Indigenous people, children, residents, and community organisations.